SMB Protocol Explained

21.02.2021

by David Zomaya

Server Message Block (SMB) is one of the most popular file server protocols today. When implemented properly, SMB enables secure, efficient, and scalable network resource and file sharing. A common challenge facing many organizations is finding SMB software that meets licensing, performance, portability, and security requirements without becoming too complex to manage. Here, we’ll take a look at the SMB protocol and popular software options for implementing it both on corporate networks and in commercial products.

02.02.2021

by Christopher R. Hertel

The story behind jCIFS

08.12.2020

by Tal Wideman

Visuality NQ Meets RPC Security Feature Update of Microsoft for Secure Netlogon Channels and RPC Calls

01.10.2020

 YNQ™ Adds Server/Client SMBv3 Capabilities To Linux OS

15.03.2020

by Tal Wideman

The Recently Revealed SMBv3 Vulnerability: Facts and highlights

25.05.2020

YNQ™ Adds Server/Client SMBv3 Capabilities To WinCE

02.01.2019

by Tal Widerman

SMB 3: What is SMB? SMB, or Server Message Block, is one of the pillars of mass data transfers across networks. In the age of data centers and virtualized servers, this is the protocol that is doing the hard lifting, by moving, copying and modifying terabytes of user data, and keeping it secure and encrypted from hackers and ransom attacks. The protocol itself has undergone a rapid evolution from its early days, and the latest Microsoft SMB 3.1.1 version is aimed at speed, flexibility and extreme security. For virtualized data centers, the SMBv3.x family of dialects is the de-facto standard for high performance, offering a rich set of functions that weren’t available earlier.  

27.04.2018

by Tal Widerman

What made WannaCry such big news is not the financial impact but the fact that it locked up a hospital to the point where operations were delayed and lives were in jeopardy.

10.09.2019

by Mark Rabinovich

In my younger days, cameras were cameras – not digital devices. In those days, connectivity meant keeping exposed films out of light, avoiding X-rays of airport scanners, and choosing the best film development kiosk. And all this did not require any digital intelligence, but rather human intelligence. Older folks can even recall choosing the right exposure, playing around with aperture and other, what some now consider cumbersome, duties for a non-professional guy.

07.12.2018

by Tal Widerman

The firewalls of routers we work behind and consider secure may not really be so. The makers of network hardware are moving too slow to catch up with new hacking exploits, and so the markets are still selling routers that haven’t been upgraded. The situation presents great dangers to users, and this has been confirmed by research findings from the security giant, Akamai.

 
 
 
 

A Java Infusion

A Java Infusion Christopher R. Hertel The story behind jCIFS A Journey A couple of summers ago, I rode the Mickelson Trail through the Black Hills of South

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SMB3 for Linux

SMB3 for Linux YNQ™ Adds Server/Client SMBv3 Capabilities To Linux OS Visuality Systems YNQ™ offers the most advanced, Non-GPL SMB client and SMB server libraries for anyone looking

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SMB3 for WinCE

SMB3 for WinCE YNQ™ Adds Server/Client SMBv3 Capabilities To WinCE The SMB protocol was introduced to Win CE in version 6 back in 2006. Microsoft kept

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Camera Connectivity

Camera Connectivity Mark Rabinovich In my younger days, cameras were cameras – not digital devices. In those days, connectivity meant keeping exposed films out of light,

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